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  • The Loop Art Map

    Loop art map coverArt on The Loop

    Your 131-mile open space gallery


    Stroll, ride or run along The Chuck Huckelberry Loop and you’re likely to spot more than desert vegetation, wildlife and fellow users.

    On the Rillito River Park, a whimsical steel sculpture of bats on bikes pays tribute to the Campbell Avenue bridge where bats roost. A three-panel tile mural created by local students can be found along the Santa Cruz, offering a historical homage to the Spanish Explorer Juan Bautista de Anza and Jesuit Missionary Padre Eusebio Kino. And a sculptural arch spanning the Julian Wash — Joining Hands — tells the story of people coming together in a joint enterprise.

    Users are able to enjoy these — and more than four dozen other pieces of art along The Loop — thanks to the Pima County Board of Supervisors longtime support of a Pima County Public Art Program. The Board established the policy back in 1990 to allocate one percent of the cost of public works’ projects on public art.

    Some of the works you’ll see along The Loop are not part of the Public Art Program, but instead are generous donations by civic-minded Loop lovers. Art helps shape the quality of life for people in Pima County by offering a form of expression that embodies our community’s spirit. It also attracts people who bring a broad array of talents and experiences to this community. Expand each River Park segment below to view the artwork along the path and its corresponding location. Numbers below correspond to the artwork's numbered location on the map.

    Download a PDF of the Loop Art Map.

    Rillito River Park

    Click to see larger imageExtreme Batty Biker - 1

    Kory Laos Park / Google Maps location
    Artist: Stephen Fairfield; Installed: 2017
    This playful steel sculpture of a bat on a mountain bike is the third in a series showcasing the role of roosting bats under the bridges along The Loop.

      

    Click to see larger imageAgave Walls - 2

    LaCholla Blvd. at Rillito River Bridge / Google Maps location
    Artist: Vicki Scuri; Installed: 2011
    Stair-stepped shapes paired with an agave cactus form create a wave motion on this 400-foot bridge, providing continuity with the wave theme found on related projects along the corridor. 

    Click to see larger imageLa Puerta - 3

    Curtis Park / Google Maps location
    Artist: Rebecca Thompson; Installed: 2007
    The large rammed earth doorway is made from local soil and Portland cement. The two bronze key panels that grace the top of the structure were created by 200 youth from Flowing Wells Jr. High and High School.

    Click to see larger imageSun Circle - 4

    North bank of Rillito east of LaCholla / Google Maps location
    Artists: Paul T. Edwards, Susan Holman, Chris Tanz; Installed: 1994
    This circular structure built of concrete block and flagstone features eight interrupted curving walls create a kiva-like circle. Six of the walls have small ports oriented toward sunrise and sunset at the summer and winter solstices, and the spring and fall equinoxes. 

    Click to see larger imageOmni Primo - 5

    Children’s Memorial Park / Google Maps location
    Artist: Joe Ventura; Installed: 1978
    The Pima County/Tucson Parks and Recreation Civic Arts Project brought together 765 children from the community to create each component of this sculpture under the guidance of Joe Ventura. Funding was provided through the Federal Recreation Summer Program.

    Click to see larger imageMagic Carpet - 6

    Children’s Memorial Park / Google Maps location
    Artist: Nicholas Burke; Installed: Unknown
    Commissioned by the Thomason Family, this sculpture is the centerpiece of an expanded memorial wall and garden.



    Click to see larger imageHard Times - 7

    Rillito Regional Park / Google Maps location
    Artist: David Flynn; Installed: 2007
    A large steel bench in the form of a horseshoe is painted the color of aluminum. Anchors in the shape of giant horseshoe nails serve to anchor the bench to the ground.
     

    Click to see larger imagePeople Play - 8

    Rillito Regional Park / Google Maps location
    Artist: Thomas Bredlow; Installed: 1981
    A tower of open steel parabolic arches narrows from its circular base to its top. Sixteen steel cut-out figures play and climb among the arches from the base to the top of the tower.


    Click to see larger imageSun Columns - 9

    Rillito Regional Park / Google Maps location
    Artist: Nina Borgia-Aberle; Installed: 2000
    Powder-coated yellow poles feature bright yellow metal circles at the top. Varied colored handmade ceramic tile bands encircle the lower portion of the poles, representing activities that take place in the Park.
     

    Click to see larger imageNature of Movement - 10

    Rillito Regional Park / Google Maps location
    Artist: Joshua Wiener; Installed: 2015
    The sculpture is created in aluminum and steel that has been submerged in concrete. The sculpture is powder-coated and cold connected.



    Click to see larger imageRillito Hawks - 11

    South bank of Rillito at Mountain Ave. / Google Maps location
    Artist: Joseph Lupiani; Installed: 2011
    Three life-size hawk sculptures with an incised feather pattern are mounted to angled steel poles.



    Click to see larger imageGateway Arch - 12

    South bank of Rillito at Mountain Ave. / Google Maps location
    Artist: Eric Lee Cooper; Installed: 1997
    The metal railing and gateway bridge include angled tops in mountain-like forms. Various small shapes are welded into the fencing including leaves, flowers, wrenches, and ratchets.



    Click to see larger imageBatty Biker Family - 13

    South bank of Rillito at Campbell Ave. / Google Maps location
    Artist: Stephen Fairfield; Installed: 2016
    This whimsical steel sculpture of bats on bikes pays tribute to the Campbell Avenue bridge where bats roost.



    Click to see larger imageA Gneiss Bench to Sit On - 14

    Rio Vista Park / Google Maps location
    Artist: Chris Tanz; Installed: 2009
    Catalina gneiss, a distinctive mixture of two colors of granite, was used to create these benches constructed of several boulders fitted together and two additional boulders that define a larger seating area. The benches face north to capture the view of the Catalinas. 

    Click to see larger imageShindigger Blue - 15

    Brandi Fenton Park / Google Maps location
    Artist: Mark Wallis; Installed: 2018
    The Shindigger Blue name was inspired by the Shindigger cactus, whose name amused the artist, a native of Indiana. The sculpture addresses aesthetic concerns that deal with balance, composition, kinetics, spatial relationships and a sense of spirited life.

    Click to see larger imageBoy and Girl on Horse - 16

    Brandi Fenton Park / Google Maps location
    Artist: The Large Art Company; Installed: Unknown
    Two young children are perched upon the back of a grazing horse. The boy seems to be totally into the moment, while the young girl is taking it in stride.


    Click to see larger imageTwo Kids on a Bench - 17

    Brandi Fenton Park / Google Maps location
    Artist: The Large Art Company; Installed: Unknown
    Two life-size children (boy and girl) read a book together on a small park bench in this high-quality American bronze.



    Click to see larger imageMemorial Butterfly Garden - 18

    Brandi Fenton Park / Google Maps location
    Artist: Unknown; Installed: 2006
    This metal sculpture pays tribute to the park’s namesake and her love of butterflies.



    Click to see larger imageTowers of a Martian Odyssey - 19

    The Dodge Bridge at Brandi Fenton Park / Google Maps location
    Artist: Art Neptune; Installed: 2018
    Inspired by the movie ”2001, A Space Odyssey” 8 steel tubes sized from 8 feet to 17.5 feet tall are spaced serendipitously along the bike path. All but one has plasma cut holes of different designs, leaving the meaning open to the viewers’ interpretation.”

    Click to see larger imageAlvernon Way Bridge - 20

    Fort Lowell to River Road / Google Maps location
    Artist: Barbara Grygutis; Installed: 2007
    The bridge design is influenced by the artist’s work, allowing the bridge form to appear to grow out of the wash.



    Click to see larger imageRecliners and Chess Tables - 21

    South bank of Rillito, east of Alvernon / Google Maps location
    Artist: Rebecca Thompson; Installed: 2008
    Four chaise lounge chairs composed of steel and polished cast concrete include a cast concrete table with either a game board top or cast objects (coffee cup, newspaper, towel, drinking glass) of concrete or bronze.


    Click to see larger imageMidsummer Night's Dream - 22

    George Mehl Family Foothills Park / Google Maps location
    Artist: Rebecca Thompson; Installed: 2010
    A restful 30′ x 25′ garden with Palo Verde trees, plants, stone seating, bronze and stainless steel sculpture.



    Click to see larger imageMarble Waters - 23

    Alamo Wash bridge, south bank of Rillito east of Swan / Google Maps location
    Artist: Robin Riley; Installed: 2008
    This combination of cascading rain and raindrops shows the abstract movement of water using 2,000 iridescent glass marbles and broken tile. The raindrops are circles of broken tile with marbles inside.

    Click to see larger imageReflections - 24

    North bank of Rillito at Craycroft / Google Maps location
    Artist: David Flynn; Installed: 2009
    Hand-forged steel bars in the shape of a Y are anchored in reinforced concrete. One of three natural boulders features a hand-forged steel relief of agave and dome.



    Pantano River Park

    Click to see larger imageColor Wash Pedestrian Bridge - 25

    Rose Hill Wash, south of Glenn/Sahuara / Google Maps location
    Artists: Joe O’Connell, Blessing Hancock, Creative Machines; Installed: 2017
    CNC—routed curvilinear panels in two subtle shades of blue appear as a flowing stream of water, adding vivid color to the already-sculptural form of this arched bridge. 


    Click to see larger imagePostcards of the Past, Present and Future - 26

    Pantano River at Lowe's, south of Speedway / Google Maps location
    Artist: Jennifer Furrier; Installed: Unknown
    Students from Desert Christian High School, St. Cyril School and Dodge Middle School came together to create this work.

    Click to see larger imageSpoked Cathedral - 27

    Pantano south of Speedway / Google Maps location
    Artist: Joseph Lupiani; Installed: 2015
    The design is reminiscent of a cathedral window, with a vegetative pattern on the lower section tying into the natural world. The star shape is based on the Arizona flag.

    Click to see larger imageBatty Biker - 28

    Pantano north of Broadway / Google Maps location
    Artist: Stephen Fairfield; Installed: 2015
    This bat on a bike pays tribute not only to the Broadway bridge where bats roost but also to the thousands of cyclists who pedal along The Loop every week.

    Click to see larger imageMichael A. Perry Memorial Park Corner Market - 29

    Michael Perry Park / Google Maps location
    Artists: Jason Butler, Hiro Tashima and youth; Installed: 2011
    Realistic -- albeit very large -- animals and abstract/geometric stacked shapes share space. All of the pieces accomplish their purpose in providing signage and attracting attention to the park. 

    Click to see larger imageMemorial Tree Park and Children's Memorial - 30

    Michael Perry Park / Google Maps location
    Artists: Justin Dykstra, Olsson & Associates; Installed: 2011
    The Memorial Tree Park is divided into seven gardens, each with its own map depicting where a memorial tree may be found. The Children’s Memorial is a semi-circle of panels with the “tree of seasons” shown.



    Julian Wash

    Click to see larger imageJoining Hands - 31

    One mile east of Roy Schoonover Trailhead / Google Maps location
    Artist: Chris Tanz; Installed: 2011
    A sculptural arch spans the path, with two sculptural “greeting” figures, drawn from Hohokam pottery, on either side of the path near Kolb. The project tells a story that unfolds as walkers and bikers move through the scenery, a story of people coming together in a joint enterprise.

    Click to see larger image

    Julian Wash West and East - 32

    Valencia Road / Google Maps location
    Artists: Darryl Lewis and Las Artes Arts & Education Center; Installed: Unknown
    Desert flowers and mountains grace this tiled piece along the Julian Wash in the midst of our own desert landscape.


    Click to see larger image

    Violin Player - 33

    Carmelin Castro Ítom Usím Children’s Park / Google Maps location
    Artists: Alex Garza and Las Artes Arts & Education Center; Installed: 2015
    A violin player, a mother and children and other cultural symbols of life in South Tucson come together in this tiled piece in the area’s first neighborhood park named for Carmelin Castro, who proudly served his Yaqui community.

    Click to see larger image

    Desert Dwellers - 34

    Carmelin Castro Ítom Usím Children’s Park / Google Maps location
    Artist: Las Artes Arts & Education Center; Installed: 2011
    Animals and reptiles of the desert are depicted in these small tiled pillars along the Julian Wash.



    Click to see larger image

    Carmelin Castro - 35

    Carmelin Castro Ítom Usím Children’s Park / Google Maps location
    Artist: Las Artes Arts & Education Center; Installed: 2011
    Students at Pima County’s Las Artes Arts and Education Center crafted this mural to pay tribute to the park’s namesake, a dedicated participant and leader of Yaqui religious and cultural ceremonies and a revered elder of the Pascua Yaqui Tribe.

    Click to see larger image

    Children's Sun Plaza - 36

    Carmelin Castro Ítom Usim Children’s Park/ Google Maps location
    Artists: Rebeca Field and Sandra Bolduc; Installed: 2011
    Metal embellishments on handrails and pavement design honor the importance of the sun in both the Yaqui and Mexican-American cultures.


    Click to see larger image

    Julian Wash Cultural History Walk Ramada - 37

    12th Avenue and 39th Street / Google Maps location
    Artist: John E. Barker, landscape architect; Installed: 2007
    The ramada serves as the beginning point for the Julian Wash Cultural History Walk, a timeline representing the many cultures that have occupied that particular site in the ancient and recent past. 



    Santa Cruz River Park

    Click to see larger image

    Ajo/Irvington Bridge - 38

    Santa Cruz between Ajo and Irvington / Google Maps location
    Artist: Vicki Scuri; Installed: 1992
    Intaglio designs used for the form liners of the concrete retaining walls were taken from the tire tracks left in the riverbed. A pattern of oblique angles and wide “V” shapes are repeated in the patterns that vary from 2 feet to 12 feet in height.

    Click to see larger image

    Puddles the Great Plains Toad - 39

    Paseo de las Iglesias / Google Maps location
    Artists: City High School students; Installed: 2016
    Rescued from a County storage facility, this vintage 1950s concrete frog was given an updated coat of paint to look like a native Great Plains Toad, a species which is found onsite at Paseo de las Iglesias.

    Click to see larger imageEntry Ramada - 40

    Paseo de las Iglesias / Google Maps location
    Artist: Andy Dufford, Chevo Studios; Installed: 2015
    This custom gable to a pre-fabricated ramada that showcases native birds and plants in layers of cut and powder coated steel.



    Click to see larger image

    Entry Monument - 41

    Paseo de las Iglesias / Google Maps location
    Artist: Andy Dufford, Chevo Studios; Installed: 2015
    The piece is a concrete etched entry monument with inset sandstone carvings of native animals and plants along with haikus on the reverse.  An LED coopers hawk luminaria sits atop the monument.

    Click to see larger imageAnza and the Kino Tile Mural - 42

    Paseo de las Iglesias / Google Maps location
    Artist: Las Artes Arts and Education Center; Installed: 2015
    This piece is a three-panel tile mural created by Las Artes students, which is themed with imagery of Spanish Explorer Juan Bautista de Anza and Padre Eusebio Kino.


    Click to see larger image

    Tumamoc and the River of Life - 43

    West bank of Santa Cruz, 1204 W. Silverlake Road / Google Maps location
    Artists: Linda Haworth, John Lovegrove, Les Wallach; Installed: 1993
    Images come from archeological digs through time. Reproductions of Hohokam village artifacts appear on the lower wall. Memorials and message tiles were made during community workshops.
     

    Click to see larger imageLuis G. Gutierrez Bridge - 44

    Cushing Street / Google Maps location
    Artist: Structural Grace Inc.; Installed: 2014
    The rich verdant land of the Santa Cruz River drew people to settle and farm here millennia ago. The integration of artistic themes on the bridge gives due reverence to this once perennial river that sustained and nourished countless generations before rapid population growth.

    Click to see larger imageSentinel Plaza - 45

    West bank of Santa Cruz at Congress / Google Maps location
    Artists: Joy Fox, Andrew Rush, Chuck Sternberg, Judith Stewart, Bob Vint; Installed: 2004
    The dominant feature of the plaza is four rammed earth sculptural monoliths that face toward the black volcanic mountain now called Sentinel Peak. Design elements include a ‘spirit’ line, plaza, and seating.

    Click to see larger imageGarden of Gethsemane - 46

    West bank of Santa Cruz at Congress / Google Maps location
    Artist: Felix Lucero; Installed: 1945
    The depiction of the Last Supper features statues all made of concrete, sand, and debris recovered from the Santa Cruz River. The piece was moved to its current location in 1982 as a part of the Santa Cruz River flood control improvements.

    Click to see larger imageMesquite Garden Archway - 47

    West bank of Santa Cruz at Congress / Google Maps location
    Artist: Barbara Grygutis; Installed: 2016
    This archway was originally part of three garden installations completed in 2000: Acacia, Willow and Mesquite. In 2016, due to land settling, the tiled archway was moved to its current location.


    Click to see larger imageSanta Cruz Gateway - 48

    West bank of Santa Cruz between St. Mary's and Speedway / Google Maps location
    Artist: Susan Gamble; Installed: 1992
    The entry mural sits in an elevated arch of used brick. Low concrete walls run the length of the park in seven separate sections. Ceramic tiles create a narrative of historical events in the nearby barrios. 

    Click to see larger imageColumbus Park Entryway - 49

    Columbus Park / Google Maps location
    Artist: Greg Schoon; Installed: 2011
    The design was sketched onto the concrete and then incised lightly into the existing pavement of the plaza next to the baseball fields. The shapes were cut by hand using diamond cutting wheels and an angle grinder. 

    Click to see larger imageDesert Bloom - 50

    Santa Cruz at Sunset Road Bridge / Google Maps location
    Artist: Daniel Martin Diaz; Installed: 2017
    The bridge railing encompasses the past, present and future of the Santa Cruz River by featuring desert blooms, flowing water, people from past, present and future communities, cottonwoods, snakes and birds that once populated the area.


    Cañada del Oro River Park

    Click to see larger imageChildren Reading - 51

    Christina-Taylor Green Park / Google Maps location
    Artist: All Classics Ltd.; Installed: 2017
    The bronze sculpture features a boy and girl reading on a log that’s emblazoned with the words “hope” and “love.” The butterflies pay tribute to Christina-Taylor Green’s love of butterflies.

    Click to see larger imageQuail Mural and Tiles - 52

    Christina-Taylor Green Park / Google Maps location
    Artists: Barbara McKee, City High School students, Laurel Inman, Ama's Mosaic; Installed: 2017
    Students painted two quail flying over a mountain landscape. A large steel butterfly perched on top is from Christina-Taylor Green’s last drawing of a butterfly.

    Click to see larger imageMountain Lion - 53

    Oracle Road, north of Pusch View Lane / Google Maps location
    Artist: Bill Moomey; Installed: 2008
    A bronze mountain lion sits atop a rock-like platform with ceramic tile mural.

     

    Click to see larger imageFamily Ride - 54

    Steam Pump Ranch / Google Maps location
    Artist: Angela Mia De La Vega; Installed: 2006
    Early pioneer children make their slow journey across plains and through fields. In a world of fast travel and too many conveniences, Family Ride expresses a gentle slowing of pace and a patient acceptance and understanding of the beauty of waiting.

    Click to see larger imageSpirit of Oro Valley - 55

    Holiday Inn, Oracle Road, north of First Ave. / Google Maps location
    Artist: Matthew Moutafis; Installed: 2004
    Steam Pump Ranch was an important way station for those traveling on horseback from the Florence/Eloy/Casa Grande roadway area into the Tucson Basin. This piece is meant to carry on Oro Valley’s goal of offering hospitality to all.

    Click to see larger imageMoonflower - 56

    Oro Valley Marketplace / Google Maps location
    Artist: Caryl Clement; Installed: 2008
    Originally a cattle ranch, the site for this piece features metal leaves, stems and flowers designed in a ‘tooled’ leather fashion harkening back to the ranching days. Each of the five sculptures depicts various growth stages of the datura plant from early flower buds to fruiting structures.

    Click to view larger image

















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