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  • Behavioral Health

    Behavioral Health

    For help with a behavioral health crisis, call (520) 622-6000 or 1-800-796-6762. For all emergencies, call 9-1-1


    Recovery Now

    Behavioral health is a term that refers to the connection between the mind and the body, especially the promotion of emotional, behavioral and mental health.

    Behavioral health treatment includes services for disorders such as:
    • substance abuse
    • mental health issues
    • other addictions

    Behavioral Health is a public health priority for Pima County and our voters have long recognized the need to care for those who are among the most vulnerable in our community, supporting the County in its efforts to make significant investments in behavioral health improvements.

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    For Request for Proposals (RFP) See Solicitations Tab Below

    Those with behavioral health challenges can go on to live productive, satisfying lives. Recovery is possible and it starts with hope and encouragement. It requires education and action - but there are resources available to help.

    More and more research clearly points to a correlation between healthy minds, healthy bodies, and healthy communities. Behavioral Health is important to everyone and behavioral disorders affect many lives. Did you know that:

    • Published studies report that about 25% of all U.S. adults have a mental illness and that nearly 50% of U.S. adults will develop at least one mental illness during their lifetime? (1)
    • Mental illness is associated with increased occurrence of chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, obesity, asthma, epilepsy, and cancer? (1)
    • In 2011, an estimated 20.6 million persons in the United States, aged 12 or older were classified with substance dependence or abuse in the past year? (2)
    1. Centers for Disease Control (2013) www.cdc.gov
    2. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (2013) www.samhsa.gov

    Pima County does not provide direct delivery of behavioral health services, Crisis Response Center but the County continues to make substantial investments in improving the availability and accessibility of behavioral health care and by involvement in many community initiatives that seek to improve the quality of care in our community for our most vulnerable citizens.

    The County continues to make significant investments to support the behavioral health system, including court-ordered evaluation services, behavioral health services for inmates at the jail and behavioral health services for juveniles at the juvenile detention center.

    In addition, Pima County built new state of the art facilities on the southwest side of the city after Pima County voters overwhelmingly approved two bond packages totaling more than $66 million dollars that were to be used to build infrastructure to support behavioral health services. These facilities, the Crisis Response Center (CRC) and the Behavioral Health Pavilion (BHP), opened in August of 2011. Pima County then leased these facilities to those who provide crisis and behavioral health services in Pima County.

    The Crisis Response Center (CRC), University of Arizona near Ajo Way and Country Club Road, helps ease the pressure on local emergency rooms and the adult and juvenile detention centers. This facility also assists first responders by having a central drop-off location for those in behavioral health crisis. This has also dramatically decreased the amount of time law enforcement personnel are unavailable to take other calls for assistance by getting them back on the street quicker, since the average drop-off time for adults at the CRC is less than 10 minutes.

    The BHP offers inpatient psychiatric beds, a new Emergency Department, and a Pima County Courtroom for the purpose of hearings related to civil commitment proceedings (Title 36, Chapter 5).

    Crisis Services and ongoing support

    Two new facilities at Ajo Way and Country Club Road are ensuring there is no wrong door when you or someone you know is in crisis.


    For behavioral health crisis, call (520) 622-6000 or 1-800-796-6762. For all emergencies, call 9-1-1.
    Physicians

    How do I help someone struggling with mental illness who needs immediate care but refuses to accept treatment voluntarily?

    Arizona Revised Statutes, Title 36, Chapter 5, create the ability to compel a person to receive a mental health evaluation against their will, if certain criteria are met. For more information on this process, including a brochure on court-ordered mental health, please click the following link to the Pima County Attorney’s Office section on civil commitment, www.pcao.pima.gov/MentalHealth.aspx.

    How do I know when I should call the police or when I should seek help?

    If ever you believe a person is an immediate threat to themselves or others, seek help by calling 9-1-1. If it’s not an emergency, but you aren’t sure what to do, the Pima County Attorney’s Office has created an easy to follow flow chart to help answer your questions. It also lists valuable resources and information whether you are concerned about your own mental health or that of a friend, loved one, employee, student, or acquaintance. To see the flow chart, click http://www.pcao.pima.gov/documents/MentalHealthFlowchart.pdf

    Does the county regulate behavioral health services in Pima County?

    Pima County does not regulate or provide services to the citizens of Pima County. The services available exist in both the public and private sector. Pima County continues to invest resources in building infrastructure for health services, as well as participating in community initiatives that improve the delivery and availability of health services in our community.

    Do people in the Pima County Jail receive behavioral health services?

    Yes, detainees at the Pima County Adult Detention Complex are evaluated and given medications and other treatment as clinically necessary. Care of the mentally ill in detention is a priority for Pima County and detainees are evaluated at booking for medical and behavioral health needs.

    Are free behavioral health services available?

    Anyone can receive crisis services at the Crisis Response Center. For those with insurance, your plan may be billed. For those without, you may be eligible for state-funded crisis services. Staff at the CRC evaluate eligibility for benefits as part of the intake process.

    For outpatient services (those which are not crisis services), you can contact Community Partnership of Southern Arizona for an evaluation of your eligibility for help paying for services with Medicaid dollars through the Arizona Health Care Cost Containment System (AHCCCS). For those who do not qualify, many service providers offer a sliding fee scale for their services.

    For those with private insurance, check with your carrier to see which services are available to you, and which providers are in your network. Generally, psychiatric care, medication management, therapy and inpatient services are covered by many of the major insurance companies.

    How much does it cost to file papers to start a civil commitment process?

    There is no cost to file an application for involuntary evaluation or an application for emergency admission for evaluation. Both processes are defined in Arizona Revised Statutes, Title 36, Chapter 5 and are commonly referred to as “petitioning” someone. There is no monetary cost to the person who files the paperwork. It may cost time, as the person who files the application must also testify if there is a hearing.

    Is a person who has been forced into the hospital for court-ordered evaluation responsible for paying for the hospital bill?

    Pima County is responsible for paying for the inpatient days needed to complete the evaluations (usually no more than the first 3 days.) If the person continues to need inpatient services and/or has not yet had their hearing in front of a judge, the person’s insurance may be billed for the remainder of the stay. For those who are uninsured and eligible for Medicaid funding through the Arizona Health Care Cost Containment System (AHCCCS), the hospital staff will evaluate and assist the person in enrolling in these services.

    What services are available for children?

    Crisis behavioral health services are available for children via the Crisis Response Center (CRC). There is a children’s facility in the CRC designed to provide crisis services for children and adolescents and to stabilize kids in crisis. Children can stay for up to twenty-three hours. For those needing longer stabilization, the CRC staff work to transition the child into a psychiatric hospital in the area.

    Outpatient services are also available for children. Community Partnership of Southern Arizona (CPSA) is one resource for those searching for services for kids 17 and younger. If you have private insurance, check with your carriers to see what services are covered, and which providers are in your network. Most large carriers offer both mental health and substance abuse services as part of many employer plans.

    What services are available for those with Traumatic Brain Injury, Developmental Disabilities or the Elderly?

    Arizona Long Term Care System (ALTCS) is a program funded through Medicaid to provide long-term care services at little or no cost for those eligible for services. These services are for those who are elderly, blind, disabled due to traumatic brain injury or another disabling condition and those who have a developmental disability. Visit their website for more information and for instructions on applying for benefits.

    Can anyone access services at the Crisis Response Center (CRC)?

    Yes. Anyone experiencing a behavioral health crisis, regardless of age or ability to pay, can receive services at the Crisis Response Center.

    What services are available for addiction to substances?

    There are many private service providers in the community to help with substance abuse issues. There are also services available through Community Partnership of Southern Arizona. Desert Hope Detoxification Center, located on Ajo Way, is the only publicly funded detoxification program in Southern Arizona. For more information, visit CPSA’s website or call the crisis line at (520)622-6000.

    Do you need help?

    Staff

    Are you unsure if you or a loved one should ask for help? There are specific symptoms for each mental illness, but the following are some warning signs that indicate someone needs professional help:

    • marked personality change
    • inability to cope with problems and daily activities
    • strange or grandiose ideas
    • excessive anxieties
    • prolonged depression and apathy
    • marked changes in eating or sleeping patterns
    • thinking or talking about suicide or harming oneself
    • extreme mood swings—high or low
    • abuse of alcohol or drugs
    • excessive anger, hostility, or violent behavior

    A person who shows any of these signs should seek help from a qualified health professional right away. (1)

    Asking for help takes courage. Sometimes, those suffering from mental illness or abusing substances lack the insight it takes to be able to understand that help is both necessary and available. If you or someone you know is struggling with a behavioral health issue, don’t give up. Help is available. Recovery is possible. Mental illness is not an identity. Just as those who suffer from heart disease or diabetes are not defined by their illnesses, those who suffer from mental illnesses aren’t either. Mental illness is treatable and symptoms are manageable. Knowing where to turn for treatment is the key. See the Resources tab for a list of service providers in Pima County.

    (1) National Institutes of Health (2013)

    Resources

    Community Partnership of Southern Arizona: As the Regional Behavioral Health Authority, CPSA is the local agency that is most directly responsible for the management of publicly-funded behavioral health services throughout Pima County. CPSA coordinates the delivery of behavioral health treatment, from substances abuse to prevention services, through a network of treatment providers.

    Some of these providers include:

    • COPE Community Services - COPE is a private nonprofit community service and behavioral health care organization that offers programs and support for recovery from substance abuse, serious mental illness and HIV/AIDS. CPSA and Pima County are among organizations providing funding. For more information, call at (520) 792-3293 or visit them on-line at www.copebhs.com/
    • CODAC Behavioral Health Services - A nonprofit, CODAC provides a full continuum of behavioral health and substance abuse prevention, education and treatment services for children adolescents and adults. Call at (520) 327-4505 or visit www.codac.org
    • La Frontera, Arizona - A community-based, nonprofit behavioral health center, La Frontera provides a full range of mental health and substance abuse services. For more information, visit www.lafronteraarizona.com or call (520) 838-3804 to schedule an appointment.
    • Marana Health Center, behavioral health - The only rural health center in the area, the local agency provides behavioral health services to the residents of Marana and Northwest Tucson. The center offers individual and group outpatient therapy, as well as trauma services, substance abuse assessment and treatment and domestic violence assessment and treatment. For more information, visit www.maranahealthcenter.org/our-services/behavioral-health or call (520) 682-4111.
    • Providence Service Corporation - In Tucson, Providence of Arizona serves as one of the three children’s behavioral health networks in Pima County, offering a full continuum of services, from home-based counseling to substance abuse groups, crisis intervention and prevention services. For more information, call the central Tucson office at (520) 748-7108 or (800) 489-0064
    • Pantano Behavioral Health Services One of five Comprehensive Services Providers, the nonprofit is responsible for ensuring that a variety of behavioral health services are provided to children and their families in Pima County. Families may call Pantano directly at (520) 917-6485 to discuss their need for services or CPSA Member Services at (520) 318-6946.

    As always, call 911 in the case of a life-threatening emergency. If you or a loved one is in crisis, please call the Community-Wide Crisis Line at (520) 622-6000 or 1-800-796-6762, which is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, including holidays.

    Otherwise, for more information, contact CPSA at (520) 318-6946. You can also find them on-line at www.cpsa-rbha.org

    The Crisis Response Center is available to help anyone, regardless of age or ability to pay, who is Crisis Response Center experiencing an acute psychiatric emergency or other immediate behavioral health need. Operated by the Crisis Response Network of Southern Arizona with oversight from Community Partnership of Southern Arizona, the center staffs a 24-hour crisis line and can provide a safe place for short-term crisis stabilization for up to 23 hours, with some adult beds available for more intensive treatment periods of up to five days. Please call the Community-Wide Crisis Line at (520) 622-6000 or (800) 796-6762.

    Arizona Department of Health Services: Division of Behavioral Health Services The Division was created in 1986 as the single state authority to oversee the coordination, planning, administration, regulation and monitoring of the state public behavioral health system. It contracts with community based organizations, known as Regional Behavioral Health Authorities, to administer behavioral health services in specific geographic areas.

    The division also serves as a helpful resource on topics such as addiction and consumer rights, and provides links to resources as well as a list of crisis hot-lines throughout the state.

    The crisis hot-line phone number for Pima County is (520) 622-6000.

    The division may be reached at (602) 364-4558 or toll-free at1-800-867-5808. It may be reached on-line at http://www.azdhs.gov/bhs/

    Southern Arizona Mental Health Corporation, SAMHC, does not provide ongoing treatment services, but instead, provides community-wide crisis service, from evaluation to stabilization and referral. The organization does not schedule appointments, but rather is open 7 days a week from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. at its facility at 2502 N. Dodge Blvd. There is no out-of-pocket cost to a person needing crisis services and they will see you no matter your income or whether you have insurance.

    Calls are taken at (520) 617-0043. For more information, check out http://www.samhc.com/

    National Alliance on Mental Illness Southern Arizona (NAMISA) An affiliate of the national advocacy group, NAMISA is a nonprofit advocacy group that offers education and support for those with mental illness. It offers support groups and several education courses, including a family education program designed to share strategies for handling crises and how to communicate appropriately.

    They may be reached at (520) 622-5582 or at www.namisa.org

    Veterans’ Behavioral Health Services If you are a veteran, please connect with the Southern Arizona VA Health Care System, 3602 S. Sixth Ave., to see whether you qualify for services that are available for a variety of needs, from dealing with depression and post-traumatic stress disorder, to substance abuse disorders and suicide prevention. Call 792-1450 or 1-800-470-8262.

    Pima County in 2012 opened the Kino Veterans’ Workforce Center to help veterans with career and benefits counseling, housing assistance and behavioral health services and recovery. For more information, call 740-4646.

    Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration SAMHSA was established in 1992 and directed by Congress to reduce the impact of substance abuse and mental illness. The agency administers grant funding and works through a variety of centers to focus on prevention and treatment of mental disorders, to reduce the abuse of illicit substances and alcohol, and to serve as a clearinghouse for behavioral health data.

    Call at 1-877-SAMHSA-7 or visit on-line at www.samhsa.gov

    HOPE Inc. Warm Line: For those who need support but aren’t actively in crisis, operators who have themselves experienced mental illness and/or addiction in recovery are available to talk from 8 a.m. until midnight daily. Call 1-520-770-9909 if you need to connect. It is a free service.

    Compass Behavioral Health Care: A provider of affordable behavioral health care in Southern Arizona for more than three decades, it offer a continuum of care, with prevention and early intervention, as well as continuing treatment and stabilization services, as well as outpatient services. Please call us at (520) 882-5608 for more information or visit us on-line http://www.compasshc.org/

    Southern Arizona Aids Foundation (SAAF) continues to be the only community-based organization in Southern Arizona providing case management and ancillary support services for people living with HIV/AIDS and their families, culturally appropriate prevention and education programs to reduce the rate of infection, and extensive trainings and opportunities for community members to fill critical support roles. For more information, visit http://www.saaf.org/ or call (520)628-7223.

    Desert Hope Detoxification Center is the only publicly funded detoxification program in Southern Arizona. Community Partnership of Southern Arizona provides the funding for these services. For more information call the crisis line at (520) 622-6000.

    All services at Desert Hope, including assessment, are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week at 2499 E. Ajo Way. Individuals may call (520) 622-6000 or walk in to receive services.

    2-1-1 Arizona provides free and confidential information and referral services. Dial 2-1-1 or (877) 211-8661 for help with food, housing, employment, health care, counseling and more. Learn more about 2-1-1 by visiting www.211arizona.org

    Bereavement / Grief Counseling  For help with coping with grief and mourning following the death of loved ones or with major life changes, check with your employer’s benefits, they may offer free or reduced fee counseling. If you do not have this benefit, you may contact the 2-1-1 Arizona line for a current listing of agencies that may provide the service on a sliding scale fee.

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    Behavioral Health

    3950 N. Country Club Rd.
    Tucson, AZ 85714

    Office: (520) 724-7923

    RecoveryNow@pima.gov

    For crisis, call
    (520) 622-6000
    or
    1-800-796-6762

    For all emergencies, call 9-1-1


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