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  • Pima Prospers

    The Board of Supervisors adopted Pima Prospers on Tuesday, May 19, 2015.   On Monday, August 17th, they will consider the final resolution for the plan.  All of the adopted changes are reflected in the PDF versions.  The Executive Summary is now available.

    Pima Prospers is the product of an nearly two year planning process, including extensive community involvement, the engagement of all levels of government, the coordinated efforts of various County departments and the review and support of community leaders, residents, business owners and stakeholders, adjacent jurisdictions, and regional and state agencies. We look forward to the next 20 years, recognizing that in Arizona, county plans are required to be updated every 10 years.

    The Board of Supervisors also adopted the Planning and Zoning Commission's recommendations for Major Streets and Scenic Routes Plan.  

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    Navigating this site

    There are many parts to Pima Prospers divided up by chapters.
    To view the plan online use the links and drop down arrows by each chapter and goal below.
    To view the entire pdf. version, you may download the policy plan by clicking the link at right (note it will print over 500 pages.)   Maps and special policies are at the bottom of this page. 
    To view the appendix, you may click on the links for each.  It is a pdf of the document. Appendix A Background and Current Conditions, Appendix B Implementation, Appendix C Public Participation, Appendix D Fiscal Analysis and Appendix E Glossary. have been updated.  To view information on Major Streets and Scenic Routes update is at this link.


    Introduction

    Plan Introduction

    Pima Prospers reflects a very different format than past plans, partly because the content has been greatly expanded and because we have taken a more comprehensive approach, since so much of what makes up a county and what county staff does are very much interconnected and interrelated.

    A printer friendly version is available.
    Land Use

    Use of Land

    The overarching goal of this chapter is to guide land use, housing, conservation, and community design decisions consistent with the plan's vision and based on community input. This chapter advances the welfare of our people and our community by creating convenient, equitable, healthy, efficient and attractive environments.
    A printer friendly version is available.
    Physical Infrastructure

    Physical Infrastructure

    This chapter provides goals and policies related to the efficient use of existing and planned infrastructure needed to support current and future populations. Each of the topics in the chapter either cover a part of the county's critical infrastructure, connect people and goods or both.

    A printer friendly version is available.
    Human Infrastructure graphic

    Human Infrastructure

    This chapter provides goals and policies related to the efficient provision of existing and future services needed to support the current and forecasted populations. While none are required by state law, they all play a significant part in how our county functions.
    A printer friendly version is available
    Economic Development graphic

    Economic Development

    This chapter proposes goals and policies on such subjects as promoting economic development, tourism, business climate, and the arts. It will be aligned with the County Administrator's 2015-2017 Economic Development plan once it is completed this year.
    A printer friendly version is available.
    Cost of Development graphic

    Cost of Development

    This section establishes the goal and policy framework for developing implementation measures that will result in public-private cost sharing of capital facilities and services needed to serve new development.
    A printer friendly version is available

    Chapter 8: Land Use Legend and Maps


    8.1 Preface and Map Interpretation

    The Land Use Intensity Legend included in this chapter complements the Regional Plan Policies provided throughout this comprehensive plan as well as the Special Area and Rezoning Policies included in Chapter 9. It is to be used in conjunction with the Land Use maps in Section 8.2. The following planned land use intensity categories are designated on the Pima County Comprehensive Plan (Plan), which was initially adopted by the Pima County Board of Supervisors on October 13, 1992, revised on December 18, 2001 and the most recent version update was adopted on [insert date of adoption of this plan]. Land uses are only shown for land in unincorporated Pima County.
    ( Land Use change recommendations from the Planning and Zoning Commission are linked.)

    Unless otherwise noted, references to code chapters or sections are to the Pima County Zoning Code as of the date of adoption of this plan or as may be amended.

    Please refer to section 10.4 of the Administration chapter of the Plan for how the rezoning process, conditional use process, and the Transfer of Development Rights (TDRs) relate to the plan, open space requirements, and the calculation of possible densities and uses for properties affected by resource areas on Regional Hydrology Maps (Section 4.9 of the Physical Infrastructure Chapter).

    Land Use Legend

    The Land Use Intensity Legend is composed of a number of “urban/suburban”, “rural” land use and general categories. Urban/suburban designations are usually used in the metropolitan Tucson, Green Valley and certain unincorporated communities. Rural land uses are generally used in exurban and rural locales. General categories can be found throughout the unincorporated county. Each category includes a description of the objectives and the types of uses intended for that category. In addition, most categories that allow residential uses include a minimum and maximum gross density, defined as residences per acre (RAC). Only land area zoned and planned for residential use, or open space areas not including golf courses, shall be included in gross density calculations.

    Effective densities throughout the rezoning process may be constrained by hydrology, open space requirements, overlay zones, cultural resources and many other factors.

    A. Urban/Suburban Intensity Categories

    The following land use intensity categories shall be applied to designate planned land use within urban and suburban areas only:
    1. Community Activity Center (CAC)
      1. Objective: To designate medium and higher intensity mixed use districts designed to provide a full range of goods and services; office and medical uses; hotels; research and development opportunities; educational and institutional uses; and other similar uses as described in the Campus Park Industrial (CPI) zoning district (Section 18.49); and compatible medium to higher density housing. Individual rezoning requests do not necessarily have to be a mixed use project; however, the application must demonstrate how it serves to create or enhance the mixed use character of the designated activity center as a whole.

        Larger centers may include a regional mall. Smaller centers may provide goods and services needed on a more frequent basis. These may include a major supermarket, discount department stores, large variety stores, or specialty stores such as a hardware/building/home improvement stores. Community Activity Centers may be located on major arterial roadways with access to public transportation. All centers will have direct pedestrian and bicycle access to surrounding neighborhoods. Community Activity Centers may range from 25 acres to up to 100 acres or more in size depending on the area served and services provided.
      2. Residential Gross Density:  Residential gross density, if any, shall conform to the following:
        1. Minimum – 6 RAC
        2. Maximum - As allowed by the requested conforming zoning district.
      3. Residential Gross Densities for Developments Using Transfer of Development Rights (TDRs):

        Projects within designated Receiving Areas utilizing TDRs for development  shall conform to following density requirements:
        1. Minimum – 6 RAC
        2. Maximum – 18 RAC
    2. Neighborhood Activity Center (NAC)
      1. Objective: To designate lower intensity mixed use areas designed to provide goods and services within  or near residential neighborhoods for day-to-day and weekly living needs. Neighborhood Activity Centers provide lower-intensity commercial services. For example a grocery market may be the principle anchor tenant along with other neighborhood services, such as a drugstore, variety/hardware store, self-service laundry, , and bank. The center may include a mix of medium-density housing types. Neighborhood Activity Centers are generally less than 25 acres in size. Larger centers provide opportunity for more of a mix of intensive non-residential uses and medium-density residential uses, and are to be located on arterials. Smaller mixed use centers may contain medium density residential uses and may be located along collector or arterial streets. All centers will have direct pedestrian and bicycle access to the surrounding neighborhoods. Individual rezoning requests do not necessarily have to be a mixed use project; however, the application must demonstrate how the project serves to create or enhance the mixed use character of the designated activity center as a whole.
      2. Residential Gross Density:  Residential gross density, if applicable, shall conform to the following:
        1. Minimum – 5 RAC
        2. Maximum - 12 RAC
      3. Residential Gross Densities for Developments Using Transfer of Development Rights (TDRs).
        Projects within designated Receiving Areas utilizing TDRs for development shall conform to the following density requirements:
        1. Minimum – 5 RAC
        2. Maximum – 8 RAC
    3. Multifunctional Corridor (MFC)
      1. Objective: To designate areas for the integrated development of complementary uses along major transportation corridors. The MFC designation serves a similar purpose as the CAC plan designation. These areas contain commercial and other non-residential use services, research and development and similar uses (as delineated in the CPI zoning district) and medium to high density residential clusters in a linear configuration along major transportation corridors. Potential adverse impacts of strip commercial development are mitigated through application of special design standards, in the zoning code and design manuals such as standards for access management, building setbacks, open space, signs, parking, and landscaping. Residential Gross Density: Residential gross density, if applicable, shall conform to the following:
        1. Minimum – 6 RAC
        2. Maximum - As allowed by the requested conforming zoning district.
        Residential Gross Densities for Developments Using Transfer of Development Rights (TDRs):

        Projects within designated Receiving Areas utilizing TDRs for development shall conform to the following density requirements:
        1. Minimum – 6 RAC
        2. Maximum – 18 RAC
    4. Multiple Use (MU)
      1. Objective:
        To identify multiple-use areas that contain a wide range of uses, including residential, commercial and light industrial and provide standards for how these areas should develop or redevelop in the future.  Proposals for new non-residential uses must show how the uses will minimize negative impacts on existing residential uses.
      2. Residential Gross Density: Residential gross density, if applicable, shall conform to the following:
        1. Minimum – 6 RAC
        2. Maximum - As allowed by the requested conforming zoning district.
      3. Residential Gross Densities for Developments Using Transfer of Development Rights (TDRs): Projects within designated Receiving Areas utilizing TDRs for development shall conform to the following density requirements:
        1. Minimum – 6 RAC
        2. Maximum – 18 RAC
    5. Planned Development Community (PDC)
      1. Objective: To designate existing approved specific plans. Specific plans comprise a unique zoning regimen within a planned community. Specific plan documents include detailed information on the intent of the community as a whole, as well as the individual planning and zoning districts within the specific plan area.  Applications for amendments to individual specific plans shall be done in accordance with Section 18.90 (Specific Plans) of the Pima County Zoning Code.
      2. Exception: State Trust land in the proposed Sahuarita East Conceptual Plan is designated a PDC under Special Area Policy S-36 in Chapter 9.
    6. Higher Intensity Urban (HIU)
      1. Objective: To designate areas for a mix of medium to high density housing types, such as higher density single-family development, townhomes, condominiums and apartment complexes, as well as other compatible uses, such as offices, hotels, research and development, and other similar uses.  These areas have direct access to major transportation corridors and other arterials and are within walking or bicycling distance from major commercial services and employment centers. They generally do not abut land in low intensity urban categories.  Small-scale residential compatible retail services are allowed on the first floor of a multi-story building, provided that they are accessed from an arterial and are oriented away from lower density residential development.
      2. Residential Gross Density: Residential gross density shall conform to the following:
        1. Minimum – 8 RAC
        2. Maximum - As allowed by the requested conforming zoning district.
      3. Residential Gross Densities for Developments Using Transfer of Development Rights (TDRs):
        Projects within designated Receiving Areas utilizing TDRs for development shall conform to the following density requirements:
        1. Minimum – 8 RAC
        2. Maximum – 18 RAC
    7. Medium Intensity Urban (MIU)
      1. Objective: To designate areas for a mix of medium density housing types, such as attached dwellings, garden apartments, and single family, as well as non-residential uses such as offices, medical offices, and hotels. Special attention should be given in site design to assure that uses are compatible with adjacent lower density residential uses. Where possible, pedestrian and bicycle access shall be provided to commercial areas, schools, institutional uses, and other similar uses.
      2. Residential Gross Density:  Residential gross density shall conform to the following:
        1. Minimum – 5 RAC
        2. Maximum – 13 RAC
      3. Residential Gross Densities for Developments Using Transfer of Development Rights (TDRs).
        Projects within designated Receiving Areas utilizing TDRs for development shall conform to the following density requirements:
        1. Minimum – 5 RAC
        2. Maximum – 10 RAC
    8. Medium Low Intensity Urban (MLIU)
      1. Objective: To designate areas for a mix of medium density single-family and lower density attached dwelling units; to provide opportunities for a mix of housing types throughout the region.
      2. Residential Gross Density: Residential gross density shall conform to the following:
        1. Minimum – 2.5 RAC
        2. Maximum – 5 RAC
      3. Residential Gross Densities for Developments Using Transfer of Development Rights (TDRs).
        Projects within designated Receiving Areas utilizing TDRs for development shall conform to the following density requirements.
        1. Minimum – 2.5 RAC
        2. Maximum – 4 RAC
    9. Low Intensity Urban (LIU)
      Low Intensity Urban includes four land use categories designations ranging from a maximum of 3 RAC stepped down to 0.3 RAC. The Low Intensity Urban categories are LIU3.0, LIU1.2, LIU0.5, and LIU-0.3.
      1. Objective: To designate areas for low density residential and other compatible uses and to provide incentives for residential conservation subdivisions to provide more natural open space. Density bonuses are offered in exchange for the provision of natural and/or functional open space. Natural open space must be set aside, where applicable, to preserve land with the highest resource value and be contiguous with other dedicated natural open space and public preserves.
        1. Low Intensity Urban 3.0 (LIU-3.0)
          1. Residential Gross Density:
            1. Minimum – none
            2. Maximum - 3.0 RAC.
          2. Residential Gross Densities for Developments Using Transfer of Development Rights (TDRs). Projects within designated Receiving Areas utilizing TDRs for development shall conform to the following density requirements:
            1. Minimum density 1.5 RAC
            2. Maximum density 3.0 RAC.
        2. Low Intensity Urban 1.2 (LIU-1.2)
          1. Residential Gross Density:
            1. Minimum – none
            2. Maximum – 1.2 RAC. The maximum gross density may be increased in accordance with the following options:
              1. Gross density of 2.5 RAC with 45 percent open space; or
              2. Gross density of 4 RAC with 60 percent open space.
          2. Residential Gross Densities for Developments Using Transfer of Development Rights (TDRs). Projects within designated Receiving Areas utilizing TDRs for development shall conform to the following density requirements:
            1. Minimum density – none
            2. Maximum – 1.2 RAC. The maximum gross density may be increased in accordance with the following option:
              1. Gross density of 2 RAC with 50 percent open space.
        3. Low Intensity Urban 0.5 (LIU-0.5)
          1. Residential Gross Density:
            1. Minimum – none
            2. Maximum – 0.5 RAC. The maximum gross density may be increased in accordance with the following options:
              1. Gross density of 1.2 RAC with 50 percent open space; or
              2. Gross density of 2.5 RAC with 65 percent open space.
          2. Residential Gross Densities for Developments Using Transfer of Development Rights (TDRs). Projects within designated Receiving Areas utilizing TDRs for development shall conform to the following density requirements:
            1. Minimum density – none
            2. Maximum – 0.5 RAC. The maximum gross density may be increased in accordance with the following option:
              1. Gross density of 1 RAC with 50 percent open space.
        4. Low Intensity Urban 0.3 (LIU-0.3)
          1. Residential Gross Density:
            1. Minimum – none
            2. Maximum – 0.3 RAC. The maximum gross density may be increased in accordance with the following options:
              1. Gross density of 0.7 RAC with 50 percent open space; or
              2. Gross density of 1.2 RAC with 65 percent open space.
          2. Residential Gross Densities for Developments Using Transfer of Development Rights (TDRs). Projects within designated Receiving Areas utilizing TDRs for development shall conform to the following density requirements:
            1. Minimum density – none
            2. Maximum – 0.3 RAC.  The maximum gross density may be increased in accordance with the following option:
              1. Gross density of 0.7 RAC with 60 percent open space.

    B. Rural Intensity Categories

    The following land use categories shall be applied to designate rural development intensities on the land use plan.
    1. Rural Crossroads (RX)
      1. Objective: To designate mixed use areas where basic goods and services are provided to rural settlements and rural residents as conveniently as possible. Residential densities slightly higher than the surrounding rural neighborhoods are allowed to provide opportunities especially for certain housing types such as those serving the elderly, single, and low income residents. In more developed communities, a grocery may be the principal anchor tenant, along with other uses such as a drugstore, variety/hardware store, self-service laundry, bank, and other similar uses. Such areas will generally be less than twenty acres.  Smaller rural crossroads will generally be located at rural roadway intersections of collector or arterial roads for the provision of limited commercial services to rural residents and travelers.
      2. Residential Gross Density:  Residential gross density shall conform to the following:
        1. Minimum - 1.2 RAC
        2. Maximum – 10 RAC
      3. Residential Gross Densities for Developments Using Transfer of Development Rights (TDRs): Projects within designated Receiving Areas utilizing TDRs for development shall conform to the following density requirements:
        1. Minimum – 1.2 RAC
        2. Maximum – 5.0 RAC
    2. Rural Forest Village (RFV)
      1. Objective: To designate rural villages within confines of the Coronado National Forest.
      2. Residential Gross Density:  Residential gross density shall conform to the following:
        1. Minimum – none
        2. Maximum - 1.2 RAC
      3. Zoning Districts: Only the ML Mount Lemmon Zone shall be deemed in conformance with the land use plan.
    3. Medium Intensity Rural (MIR)
      1. Objective: To designate areas for residential uses at densities consistent with rural settlements in reasonable proximity to Rural Crossroads, arterials or suburban areas.
      2. Residential Gross Density: Residential gross density shall conform to the following:
        1. Minimum – none
        2. Maximum - 1.2 RAC
      3. Residential Gross Densities for Developments Using Transfer of Development Rights (TDRs): Projects within designated Receiving Areas utilizing TDRs for development shall conform to the following density requirements:
        1. Minimum – none
        2. Maximum – 1.2 RAC
    4. Low Intensity Rural (LIR)
      1. Objective: To designate areas for residential uses at densities consistent with rural and resource-based characteristics.
      2. Residential Gross Density: Residential gross density shall conform to the following:
        1. Minimum – none
        2. Maximum - 0.3 RAC
      3. Residential Gross Densities for Developments Using Transfer of Development Rights (TDRs): Projects within designated Receiving Areas utilizing TDRs for development shall conform to the following density requirements:
        1. Minimum – none
        2. Maximum – 0.3 RAC

    C. General Intensity Categories

    The following land use categories shall be applied to designate urban and rural development intensities on the Land Use Plan maps.
    1. Industrial (I)
      1. Objective: To designate adequate area for industrial uses that, if properly located and regulated, are compatible with certain types of commercial activities. Residential development is permitted within a proposed project provided that it meets the requirements of the Mixed Use Option under the CI-1 zoning district (Section 18.51.070 of the zoning code).
      2. Zoning Districts: Only the following zoning districts shall be deemed in conformance with the land use plan:

        1. CB-1 Local Business Zone
        2. CB-2 General Business Zone
        3. CPI Campus Park Industrial Zone
        4. CI-1 Light Industrial/Warehousing Zone
        5. CI-2 General Industrial Zone
        6. SP Specific Plans
    2. Heavy Industrial (HI)
      1. Objective: To designate adequate area for higher intensity industrial uses that is not compatible with non-industrial uses.
      2. Zoning Districts: Only the following zoning districts shall be deemed in conformance with the land use plan:
        1. 1. CI-1 Light Industrial Zone
        2. 2. CI-2 General Industrial Zone
        3. 3. CI-3 Heavy Industrial Zone
        4. 4. SP Specific Plans
    3. Resource Sensitive (RS)
      1. Objective: To designate key larger parcels and land holdings with environmentally sensitive characteristics in close proximity to public preserves or other environmentally sensitive areas.  Development of such land shall emphasize design that blends with the surrounding natural desert and provides connectivity to environmentally sensitive linkages in developing areas.
      2. Residential Gross Density:
        1. Minimum – none
        2. Maximum - 0.3 RAC
      3. Residential Gross Densities for Developments Using Transfer of Development Rights (TDRs): Projects within designated Receiving Areas utilizing TDRs for development shall conform to the following density requirements:
        1. Minimum – none
        2. Maximum – 0.3 RAC
    4. Resource Conservation (RC)
      1. Objective: To designate publically-owned lands that are public resource lands and preserves that protect sensitive and high-value biological, resource value cultural, recreational and other sensitive resources lands. These do not include private or state trust lands, whether or not they are leased by the County for open space purposes. If these lands become privately held during the lifespan of this plan, they will be treated as Resource Sensitive unless otherwise designated through a plan amendment process.
      2. Residential Gross Density: None, other than allowances for life estates, ranch caretakers and similar uses.
    5. Resource Extraction (RE)
      1. Objective: To designate mining lands and to protect these areas from encroachment by incompatible uses.
      2. Residential Gross Density: Residential gross density shall conform to the following:
        1. Minimum – none
        2. Maximum - 0.3 RAC
    6. Military Airport (MA)
      1. Objective: To recognize Davis-Monthan Air Force Base (DMAFB) as a unique and significant factor in shaping the history, character, and economy of Eastern Pima County; provide guidance for future compatible land uses to promote the health, safety and welfare of the community; and, to promote the long-term viability of the base and its missions.
      2. Residential Gross Density: New residential development is not a compatible use.
      3. Zoning Districts: Only the following zoning districts in compliance with the zoning code shall be deemed in conformance with the land use plan subject to compliance with the zoning code:
        1. CB-1 Local Business Zone
        2. CB-2 General Business Zone
        3. CPI Campus Park Industrial Zone
        4. CI-1 Light Industrial/Warehousing Zone
        5. CI-2 General Industrial Zone
        6. SP Specific Plan Zone

    8.2 Land Use and Regional Hydrology Maps

    The 13 Land Use maps which follow cover the unincorporated county except for the Tohono O’Odham Nation and the Pascua Yaqui Tribe.  They should be used as a resource along with the Regional Hydrology maps in Section 4.9 of this plan and the Maeveen Marie Behan Conservation Lands System map in Section 3.4 of this plan. The land use legend is described in Section 8.1 above. Application and interpretation of the maps is addressed in Chapter 10, Plan Administration.

    Another key map is the Focused Development Investment Area Map, found at this link.

    Click on map links in table below to open pdf. The large Land Use maps may take a few minutes to open.

    Land Use Maps (big) Hydrology  Maps
     Ajo-Why Ajo-Why
    Altar Valley Altar Valley
    Avra Valley Avra Valley
     Catalina Foothills Catalina Foothills
     Central Central
    Mountain View Mountain View
     Rincon Valley Rincon Valley
     San Pedro San Pedro 
     Southeast Southeast
    Southwest Southwest
    Tortolita Tortolita
     Tucson Mountains Tucson Mountains
    Upper Santa Cruz  Upper Santa Cruz

    Chapter 10 Comprehensive Plan Administration


    10.1 Introduction

    This chapter provides the necessary guidance to administer, amend and interpret the Plan. The attached chapter is an update.   The Comprehensive Plan is the product of an eighteen month planning process, including extensive community involvement, the engagement of all levels of government, the coordinated efforts of various County departments and the review and support of community leaders, residents, business owners and stakeholders, adjacent jurisdictions, regional and state agencies. This chapter ensures that future amendments of the Comprehensive Plan further the vision of Pima County as a healthy community as outlined in Chapter 1; and that the vision, goals, and policies are implemented in a fair and equitable manner.

    The development of the County Comprehensive Plan, Pima Prospers, is the product of countless hours of work by women and men from many Pima County agencies; citizens from across the County who provided critical input; our Guidance Team made up of senior management, Planning and Zoning Commission members and representatives of other jurisdictions; and our consultant team.

    Pima Prospers policies are not intended to be applied to land being developed which has already been through legislative review and approval in the County.

    10.2 Comprehensive Plan Authority and Interpretation

    The Comprehensive Plan is the primary overarching policy blueprint for the County. It has a major impact on the future of the County by setting forth guiding policies for governance in many areas of County responsibility and for future development and redevelopment notably when a land use is change is requested within the unincorporated county.  It provides the general direction of physical and human infrastructure for the county and for the long term economic development of the county. The major objectives of the comprehensive planning process are to preserve and enhance the quality of life in Pima County; support a healthy community where individuals can live, work, learn, and play; protect cultural and natural resources and promote economic development.

    Authority

    All policies and implementation measures denoted in this Comprehensive Plan shall follow all relevant federal, state and Pima County laws and regulations, as may be amended.  Further, Pima County is committed to protecting private property rights.  Pima Prospers is an important tool in land use planning and a roadmap for future development, but must protect or grandfather these property rights fro existing entitlements.

    Pima County recognizes that continued lingering of an economic recession and the role of new planned development plays in shaping our community and economic future.  As such, Pima Prospers will balance the benefits of policies applicable to development and the cost of compliance.  This must be done to ensure we have sustainable growth, affordable housing, new retail and commercial centers and are attractive to companies seeking to invest in job creation in our region.

    Authority and direction to plan come from Arizona State Statutes, expressly the Growing Smarter and Growing Smarter Plus Acts, as amended as well as other directives embedded in Statute. Pima County Zoning Code Chapter 18.89 provides a more specific framework for the County’s Comprehensive Plan efforts. Citizen involvement is per the Public Participation Plan as called for in Statute and as adopted by the Board of Supervisors; it can be found in Appendix C of this Plan.

    General Implementation

    Once the Comprehensive Plan is adopted, overall day to day administration of the plan falls under the Planning Division of the Development Services Department.  An Interagency Monitoring Team, operating and formed under the auspices of the County Administrator will monitor and oversee progress on implementation of Pima Prospers as described in Section 10.8 below.  For infrastructure planning, one of the purposes of the Integrated Facilities Planning System, described further in Section 4.7 of the plan, will be to inform the work of the Interagency Monitoring Team.

    There are many policies and implementation actions in Pima Prospers, and they serve different purposes. Most of the policies and actions are direction to county officials and county staff, often working in multidisciplinary teams, with other jurisdictions, the non-profit sector and the private sector. Most of the direction, for example, in the Economic Development Chapter and Human Infrastructure Connectivity Chapter fits into that category.

    One of the tools used to implement the Comprehensive Plan is the rezoning and specific plan process in accordance to the land use maps in the plan. In furtherance of that, there are also policies and
    implementation actions that have applicability to proposed changes in land use (rezoning or specific plans, most particularly) on individual properties. These may be used in the form of rezoning conditions or included within the text of specific plans relative to a specific piece of property. Many of these types of policies appear in the Use of Land Chapter and the Physical Infrastructure Connectivity Chapter.

    There are also policies which serve both purposes. A policy may be primarily directed internally to the county, however may also be applied to a rezoning or specific plan change, depending on the size or location of the request. Comprehensive plan policies are not applied directly to subdivisions or development plans without having been addressed as a condition in a rezoning or specific plan approval. Exceptions are decisions made by the Design Review Committee or when the basis of a comprehensive plan policy has been codified into a county ordinance.

    Administration and implementation of the land use components of the plan fall primarily with the Planning Division of the Pima County Development Services Department in coordinated consultation with other county agencies.

    The words "guideline" or "guidelines" are assumed to mean "voluntary" , unless another explanation is provided in context of a specific use of the word.  The words "standard" or "standards: are assumed to mean a requirement, unless explanation is provided in context of a specific use of the word.

    Interpretation

    Interpretation authority of the Land Use Map, Map Legend, Application of Plan Goals and Policies or any part or parts of this document lies with the Planning Director.  Where there may be an issue with a map interpretation involving a wash centerline, floodplain, or the Regional Hydrology Maps contained herein, the Planning Director shall consult with the Director of the Pima County Flood Control District.  Any decision as to the appropriateness of the specific circumstances of an application of a specific policy is made by the Planning Director in consultation with the director (s) of the department (s) most responsible for the implementation of the policy.  Appeal of a Comprehensive Plan interpretation of the Planning Director may be made to the Board of Supervisors.

    10.3 Rezoning Process and Comprehensive Plan Compliance

    The planned land use maps and focused area development maps in the Comprehensive Plan set the
    framework for how the unincorporated county is to grow over time, most notably over the next twenty
     years. A prime means of implementing the Comprehensive Plan and particularly the land use portion of the vision is through the rezoning process, ultimately a legislative action of the Board of Supervisors. Applicable policies are considered in this legislative process. All rezoning requests and specific plans must demonstrate conformance to the Comprehensive Plan land use maps by law. Approval of subdivision plats and development concept plans may be necessary to implement a rezoning and its conditions of approval. It is not the intent to mandate land use policies of this plan independently to subdivision plats and development concept plans.

    Site Analysis

    Petitioners for rezoning of any parcel greater than one acre in size to be developed at a residential density of four or more residences per acre; or greater than one acre in size to be developed for non-residential uses; or greater than five acres in size shall submit a Site Analysis prepared in accordance with Pima County Site Analysis Requirements, as referenced in Section 18.91.030F of the Pima County Zoning Code.

    10.4 Land Use Map and Legend Implementation and Interpretation

    The land use map and legend provided in Chapter 8 lay out a framework for growth and development in
    the unincorporated area of Pima County.

    The designation of land use intensity categories on the Plan’s Land Use Maps and its linkage to the Zoning
    Code (Chapter 18.89) provides a mechanism to assure that rezoning and specific plan approvals are
    consistent with the Plan. Rezoning applications (Section 18.91.040C) and specific plan applications
    (Section 18.90.030E) must comply with the Plan. In addition, staff reports for conditional use applications
    (Section 18.97) should include an analysis of the request in relation to the policies and land use
    designations of the Plan.

    Projects utilizing Transfer of Development Rights (TDR’s) shall conform to the requirements of Section
    18.92 of the Zoning Code as well as the density requirements of the individual plan category, except when
    part of a specific plan. However, the Board of Supervisors, on appeal at public hearing, may modify the
    required minimum density if environmental site constraints preclude the ability to achieve the minimum
    density.

    An applicant for rezoning may request any zoning district, except where noted, that conforms to the
    density requirements and the objectives of the particular land use category in which the property is
    located. Following review of the application, the Board of Supervisors, if it desires to approve the project,
    may approve it for any zoning district, subject to proper notice, that it feels best serves the need of the
    project and the community.

    An applicant for rezoning may seek reduction of the minimum density requirement from the Planning
    Director if the applicant believes that environmental site constraints preclude the ability to achieve the
    minimum density. The Planning Director’s decision may be appealed by the applicant to the Board of
    Supervisors at the public hearing for the rezoning request. A request for the Major Resort (MR) zone is
    permissible in any category except in the Industrial (I), Heavy Industrial (HI), Military Airport (MA),
    Resource Extraction (RE), and Rural Forest (RFV) land use categories.

    For purposes of clarity and readability only, many regulated watercourses and floodplains especially many
    with flows of less than 10,000 cfs (cubic feet per second) are not shown on the Land Use Maps. Refer to
    the Regional Hydrology maps in Chapter 4, Flood Control and Drainage Element. Where a regulated
    watercourse is a boundary between two different plan categories, the centerline of the watercourse shall
    serve as the boundary. Densities within a resource area may be transferred to other areas of the project
    area outside of the resource area provided all other requirements can be met; however, no dwelling units
    or other inhabitable or accessory structures may be built within the regulated watercourse. Refer to
    Section 4.9 Goal 1, Implementation Measure “a”, as well as the Floodplain Management Ordinance (Title
    16 of the Pima County Code).

    Rezoning applications required to provide open space may propose either natural or functional open
    space, except where natural open space is required. However, the Board of Supervisors may require that
    additional natural or functional open space over what was proposed be provided depending on the
    context of the proposed rezoning.

    Transfer of Densities and Uses

    In order to provide flexibility in design, for properties under one ownership and containing two or more
    land use designations other than PDC (Planned Development Community), the densities and non-
    residential acreages can be reconfigured in a single rezoning application provided that:

    A. The total number of dwelling units of the combined designations is not exceeded;
    B. The total acreage for non-residential uses of the combined designations is not exceeded.
    C. Areas with physical constraints, such as steep slopes or floodplains, shall not be counted in
    the acreage of the donor area; and
    D. Proposed developments must demonstrate that the project will not create any additional
    negative impacts on surrounding neighborhoods and properties over what would have
    occurred if the transfer did not occur.

    10.5 Map Interpretation

    Comprehensive Plan maps are created using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) digital information from a variety of sources. Based on best available data and practices, digital files and hard-copy maps may contain errors of accuracy, completeness, or timeliness. Precision may change over time as new technologies and sources of data are implemented. Maps are for general reference and are not intended for project level planning. Consult with staff to confirm Land Use Intensity categories and other considerations for specific areas. As annual amendments and other changes to Comprehensive Plan maps are approved, the electronic version of Comprehensive Plan map layers on the Pima County GIS data server will be updated. Archival electronic versions of these map layers will be created, at minimum once a year, at the end of each yearly amendment cycle

    Countywide Mapping Interpretation Procedures

    Countywide mapping interpretation procedures for land use category boundaries are based on hydrologic features. A consistent methodology for mapping floodplain limits boundaries in compliance with Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) requirements is utilized. Interpretation and amendment of planned land use category boundaries which are based on hydrologic features must adhere to the following map interpretation procedures:

    1. The centerline of the watercourse, as it existed on the date a rezoning or similar action is approved by the Board, shall be the land use category boundary.
    2. Where a natural wash is shown as a polygon, precise location of its boundaries, as determined by detailed studies accepted by the County, shall be the land use category boundaries.
    3. Where a Resource Conservation or “Resource Transition” map boundary is based upon approved floodplain limits, amendment to such boundary which redefines the mapped floodplain may be requested in accordance to the following:
      1. A FEMA Letter of Map Revision (LOMAR) application;
      2. Other detailed hydrologic study accepted by the Pima County Flood Control District; and
      3. Map revisions shall be processed as a Minor Plan Amendment to the comprehensive plan with a public hearing.

    10.6 Plan Amendment Review Program

    An annual Plan Amendment Review Program is provided in Section 18.89.040 of the Pima County Zoning Code. The annual plan amendment program provides an opportunity to address oversights, inconsistencies or land use related inequities in the plan or to acknowledge significant changes in a particular area since the adoption of the plan or plan update.

    10.7 Comprehensive Plan Amendments

    Arizona Revised Statutes §11-804 and §11-805 provide the framework for the adoption of, and amendments to, the comprehensive plan. ARS §11-804 states, “The comprehensive plan shall be developed so as to conserve the natural resources of the county, to ensure efficient expenditure of public monies and to promote the health, safety, convenience and general welfare of the public.” Pursuant to Arizona Statutes, this section includes definitions and process for Major Amendments and pursuant to the Pima County Zoning Code, Minor and other amendments.

    Comprehensive Plan Policy Amendments

    Adding a new element or substantially changing one or more elements of the Comprehensive Plan prior to performing a full ten-year Comprehensive Plan Update shall be processed in accordance with the process for a Major Amendment described below. It must follow the adopted Public Participation Process (Appendix C), however, it may be initiated at any time of the year by the Board of Supervisors or the Planning and Zoning Commission.

    A change to one or more individual comprehensive plan goals or policies short of the substantial change described above does not constitute a major amendment of the plan.

    Comprehensive Plan Major Amendment

    Pursuant to ARS 11-805, a major amendment is defined as a “substantial alteration of the county's land use mixture or balance as established in the county's existing comprehensive plan land use element for that area of the county.” It is up to the county to develop the criteria that meets this definition.

    In Pima County a Major Amendment to the Comprehensive Plan may be initiated by the Board of Supervisors or requested by private entities and are considered once each year pursuant to State statutes.

    Major Amendment applications must be submitted within the same calendar year they are being considered at a single public hearing. A Major Amendment shall be approved by an affirmative vote of at least two-thirds of the members (4 of 5) of the Board of Supervisors and is subject to the public participation plan provided in the Public Involvement Procedures included in this Comprehensive Plan (Appendix C) and adopted by the Board of Supervisors.

    Major Plan Amendment Process and Criteria

    In Pima County a Major Amendment is any development proposal that meets the following criteria: A substantial change consisting of 640 acres or more in the overall development intent or land use mix of one or more designated planning areas within the County as determined by the Board of Supervisors.

    Major Plan Amendment Application and Approval Requirements

    1. All Major Amendment applications must be submitted within the same calendar year they are being considered at a single public hearing.
    2. Major Amendments shall be approved by an affirmative vote of at least two-thirds of the members of the Board of Supervisors and are subject to the public participation goals and policies provided in the Public Involvement Procedures included in this Comprehensive Plan and adopted by the Board of Supervisors.

    Comprehensive Plan Non-Major Amendment

    A non-major amendment does not meet the definition of a “major” nor do they qualify as “Board-Initiated Amendments for Immediate Review” or “Minor Revisions”. Non-major amendments currently share with major amendments the same annual schedule for submittal.

    Staff through this plan is recommending a second window of application be added for non-major amendments so that two series can be heard in one year, in the name of better customer service for all. This addition would require an amendment to Section 18.89 (Comprehensive Plan) of the County Zoning Code.

    Other Plan Amendment Types

    Per Chapter 18.89 of the County Zoning Code, several types of minor amendments are allowed.

    Board-Initiated Amendments for Immediate Review

    This type of amendment may be initiated at any time by the Board of Supervisors per Chapter 18.89 if the Board determines waiting for the standard amendment period(s) would deny any of the following:

    1. Substantial and significant benefits of new jobs;
    2. Expanded tax base;
    3. Enhanced opportunity for disadvantage populations;
    4. Significant promotion of affordable housing, mixed use planning, and compact development;
    5. There is evidence that waiting for the normal amendment period would place the community at greater health or safety risks in the form of inadequate waste treatment facilities, inadequate or unsafe transportation improvements, hazardous environmental conditions or insufficient community or governmental services or facilities.

    This process would also apply if a revised FEMA 100-year floodplain designation has been accepted by the Pima County Regional Flood Control District.

    Minor Revisions

    Type 1a: This type of amendment addresses annexation, ownership transfers of government land, or minor revisions to resource designations consistent with accurate FEMA 100-year floodplain information. There is no public hearing but there is “notice to the Planning and Zoning Commission”. The item is on the meeting agenda and there is a short staff report. The request may be submitted at any time.

    Type 1b: This is an administrative amendment subject to approval by the commission that a scrivener’s error occurred in mapping or in text that did not reflect the Board action on a property or policy. No public notice is required, a short staff report is provided, and the commission holds a vote on the amendment. The request may be submitted at any time.

    Type 2:  This amendment applies to properties of 10 acres or less to address a planning error, planning oversight, or an incorrect planned land use designation.  The amendment must demonstrate that it was done in error and not changed based on market or physical conditions of a property (see Section 18.89.040(B)(2)(a)).  Public notice for this amendment type is sent to surrounding property owners as defined in Section 18.89.041 for the Commission and Board hearings.  A short staff report is provided and the Commission and Board hold a vote.  The request may be submitted at any time.

    Concurrent Plan Amendment/Rezoning

    This amendment is for applicants to save time by overlapping the plan amendment and rezoning processes. To qualify, the request must comply with the specific criteria found in Section 18.89.041(C)(4), must have minimal impacts on surrounding properties, be consistent with regional policies, and the property must have no previous concurrent amendments. A staff report is provided and presented at both public hearings. The request may be submitted at any time.

    Non-substantial Modifications and Updates

    As this plan will likely be viewed mostly on-line, any updates to URL links, references to other reports or studies that may be amended, and similar edits may be made under authorization of the Planning Director to keep the plan a current as possible.

    10.8 Implementing and Monitoring the Comprehensive Plan

    Through its lifecycle, progress on implementation of Pima Prospers shall be monitored and overseen by an Interagency Monitoring Team (IMT) operating and formed under direction of the County Administrator. The IMT’s mission will be working to seek alignment between the Comprehensive Plan, Annual Budget of the County, the County’s Capital Improvement Program and Budget, and any potential bond program. The vision, goals and policies of the plan in seeking a healthy community should be reflected wherever possible, recognizing that performance of the day to day county functions transcend the comprehensive plan. The work of the team shall be separate from the annual plan amendment cycle covered in Chapter 18.89. The Planning Director will chair or co-chair the team at least for the first two years. It will meet at least quarterly to:
    1. Oversee the overall implementation program of the Comprehensive Plan, issuing a 3-5 year, annually updated work program for electronic publication based on input from participating departments.

    2. Establish reasonable benchmarks on which to base progress, achievement, and in part, the annual report.

    3. Receive timely updates from lead departments on the progress on identified implementation strategies, and any necessary deviations from the strategy.

    4. Produce an annual report for the Planning and Zoning Commission,  Board of Supervisors, County Administrator and electronic publication recognizing projects completed, projects in progress, and projects slated to begin in the new fiscal year. The work program in Appendix B will serve as the initial work program and model for annual updates.
    5. Working collaboratively with appropriate County leadership, develop mechanisms to ensure that the Comprehensive Plan is both a resource and reference in creation of the annual county budget, capital improvement program and bond programs, should they occur.
    6. Recommend, if necessary, text amendments to the Comprehensive Plan to the Planning and Zoning Commission and the Development Services Department as well as the primary implementing department if other than Development Services, based on the team’s experience.
    7. Seek input at least annually from private sector and other community stakeholders, including land use professionals, and how the Plan is affecting businesses, the community's economic growth and other concerns.
    8. Perform other duties as may be assigned  by the County Administrator or required to meet the mission of the team.
    Adjustments in process may be necessary over time to accomplish the mission efficiently and effectively, and be accountable to the Planning and Zoning Commission, Board of Supervisors, County Administrator and participating departments. The intent is to bring alignment, encourage innovation, and conserve resources, not to add to the processing bureaucracy.

    10.9 Community Plans

    More detailed plans that focus on a particular community or a discrete geographic area within Pima County, or that focus on specific policy element(s) or subject areas of county interest may be adopted. The process for developing a community plan may be initiated by area residents, the Development Services Department, the Planning and Zoning Commission, or by the Board of Supervisors. The initiation of the process to develop a community plan shall be determined by the Board of Supervisors. Community plans shall undergo public participation, public notice, staff review, and public hearing processes equivalent to the comprehensive plan update. A community plan would be considered part of the overall comprehensive plan and must be consistent with it. Community plans are intended to supplement, not supplant the Comprehensive Plan. A community plan process may consider land use changes, but any land use changes shall be presented separately as amendments to the Comprehensive Plan itself.

    10.10 Comprehensive Plan Update

    A Comprehensive Plan Update is initiated by the County Board of Supervisors and includes the adoption of a new comprehensive plan or the update or re-adoption of the existing comprehensive plan. According to state statute, the adoption of a new comprehensive plan or the update or re-adoption of the existing comprehensive plan shall be approved by an affirmative vote of at least two-thirds of the members of the Board of Supervisors. All Comprehensive plan updates are subject to the Public Involvement Procedures Program included in this Comprehensive Plan and adopted by the Board of Supervisors pursuant to State Statutes. A Comprehensive Plan Update shall be conducted at least once every ten years. However, changing conditions may warrant a Comprehensive Plan Update on a more frequent basis as determined by the Board of Supervisors.

    10.11 Existing Zoning Plans

    There are two zoning plans which remain in effect in Pima County, one known as the Catalina Foothills Area Plan and the other known as the Lago del Oro Zoning Plan. These are not part of the Comprehensive Plan but may be reviewed along with the Comprehensive Plan for conformance in a land use change. A property owner requesting the zone designated by the zoning plan may either submit an approved subdivision plat or seek a “Waiver of Platting Process”. The latter is essentially the rezoning process but the presentation  before the commission is not technically a public hearing (i.e. the public hearing was held back when the zoning plan was approved).

    10.12 Existing Approved Entitlements with Approved Zoning or Development Agreements

    There are numerous properties throughout Pima County which have received necessary planning and
    zoning approvals from Pima County and have made ongoing investments in those properties in
    anticipation of the recovery of the commercial and residential real estate markets. Their development
    plans and plats are required to comply with the zoning approval conditions of zoning, specific plan, any
    other applicable county ordinances and the terms of signed development agreements. The plats and
    plans are not required to conform to Comprehensive Plan policies unless they have been captured
    within a specific plan or conditions of a rezoning.

    10.13 Conservation Lands System Definitions

    Any proposed change in Appendix E to a definition related to any part of the Conservation Land System
    that would have the effect of changing a policy in Goal 1 of Section 3.4 of this plan (including Exhibits 3.4.1
    and 3.4.2) shall be considered a substantial change requiring public hearings by the Planning and Zoning
    Commission and the Board of Supervisors.

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    Tucson, AZ 85701

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