Healthy Holidays

Mask up. Stay apart. Wash up. Stay home.


The 2020 holiday season will look different than usual. There will be new stresses mixed with the usual ones. Traditions and traveling may be altered.

Please keep in mind, a large driver of current COVID-19 transmission is small household gatherings with family and friends. People might feel safe around people they trust and remove their mask or do not distance, but contract COVID-19 or spread the virus to their loved ones.

Pima County, we can continue to work together to have a happy and healthy holiday season, and protect our loved ones! From Halloween to New Year's Eve, we have recommendations on what you and your family can do to help slow the spread of COVID-19 in the community while still celebrating!

Recommendations for Thanksgiving 2020

Thanksgiving is a time when many families gather from near and far to celebrate together. However, this year PCHD recommends adapting many traditions to increase safety.

Best plan:

  • Celebrate only with people who live in your household, or host a virtual dinner for friends and family.
  • Watch sports, parades, and movies from home.
  • Shop online rather than in person on the day after Thanksgiving or the following Monday.

If people are coming over:

  • Avoid sharing utensils, cups, plates, and food. 
  • Avoid self-serve or buffet-style dining. Select one person to serve the meal, or have pre-filled plates ready. 
  • Limit tables to one for each household.
  • Open windows or doors, weather permitting, to allow air to flow. 
  • Keep a guest list. It could help with contact tracing. 

If you're going out:

  • Travel only with other members of your household.
  • Bring extra sanitizer, alcohol wipes, and extra masks when visiting pumpkin patches or orchards where people touch pumpkins or pick apples.
  • Prepare traditional family recipes for family and neighbors, especially those at higher risk of severe illness from COVID-19, and deliver them in a no-contact manner.

For travelers:

Traveling increases the chance of getting and spreading COVID-19. Staying home is the best way to protect yourself and others. People planning to travel for Thanksgiving should consider their transportation type (plane, car, bus, train, sleigh), the dates of their trip, and their risk to COVID-19 exposure while traveling.

For everyone-

  • Before departure, find out how widespread COVID-19 is at your destination.
  • Bring enough medications to last the entire trip.
  • Carry a travel hygiene kit—sanitizer, alcohol wipes, and extra masks. 

By car-

  • If you must travel, short trips by car with members of your household are best.
  • Minimize stops for gas, food, or bathroom breaks (if possible!)
  • Pack food, stop at drive-throughs, or use curbside pickup.
  • Designate one party member to handle transactions.
  • Wear masks when interacting with servers or cashiers.

By plane, train or bus-

  • Wear a mask while in your seat.
  • Avoid touching surfaces—turnstiles, handrails, restroom surfaces, elevator buttons, and benches—as much as possible. Wipe down armrests and tray tables.
  • Stay at least 6 feet from people not from your household. Avoid crowded public spaces, especially at terminals, stations and stops. 
  • Wash your hands when you arrive and sanitize when you leave.
  • Try to travel during non-peak hours, when there are likely to be fewer people.
  • Bring a reusable water bottle for every member of your group.

Additionally:

  • Avoid bars, house parties, and other crowded indoor places.
  • Don't drink and drive. Many cab and ride share companies offer free holiday rides to those who are unsafe to drive.
  • Get your flu shot.

Recommendations for Hanukkah 2020 (5781)

Put a new spin on the Festival of Lights to help stop COVID-19. The PCHD highly recommends avoiding gatherings outside your immediate household or traveling and adapting some traditions to increase safety.

For gatherings:

Remember that anytime you gather with people you do not live with, the risk of infection increases for everyone.
  • Hold celebrations to 10 people or fewer indoors, 25 outdoors.
  • Limit tables to one for each household.
  • Avoid sharing utensils, cups, plates, and food.
  • Wear masks and stay 6 feet away from other guests, even outside
  • Open windows and doors to allow air to flow, weather permitting, if gathering indoors.
  • Encourage guests to bring their own food, drinks, and treats. Do not share utensils or drinking cups.
  • Assign a scorekeeper for games of dreidel. Track gelt on a notepad, not in a central pot.
  • Keep a list of invited guests to help with contact tracing, if necessary.

For travelers:

Traveling increases the chance of getting and spreading COVID-19. Staying home is the best way to protect yourself and others. People planning to travel should consider their transportation type (plane, car, bus, train), the dates of their trip, and their risk to COVID-19 exposure while traveling.

For everyone-

  • Before departure, find out how widespread COVID-19 is at your destination.
  • Bring enough medications to last the entire trip.
  • Carry a travel hygiene kit—sanitizer, alcohol wipes, and extra masks. 

By car-

  • If you must travel, short trips by car with members of your household are best.
  • Minimize stops for gas, food, or bathroom breaks (if possible!)
  • Pack food, stop at drive-throughs, or use curbside pickup.
  • Designate one party member to handle transactions.
  • Wear masks when interacting with servers or cashiers.

By plane, train or bus-

  • Wear a mask while in your seat.
  • Avoid touching surfaces—turnstiles, handrails, restroom surfaces, elevator buttons, and benches—as much as possible.. Wipe down armrests and tray tables.
  • Stay at least 6 feet from people not from your household. Avoid crowded public spaces, especially at terminals, stations and stops. 
  • Wash your hands when you arrive. Sanitize when you leave.
  • Try to travel during non-peak hours, when there are likely to be fewer people.
  • Bring a reusable water bottle for every member of your group.

Additionally:

  • Avoid bars, house parties, and other crowded indoor places.
  • Don't drink and drive. Many cab and ride share companies offer free holiday rides to those who are unsafe to drive.
  • Get your flu shot.

Recommendations for Christmas 2020

Give the gift of good health this Christmas and keep COVID-19 under wraps. Staying home is the best way to protect yourself and others. The PCHD highly recommends avoiding gatherings outside your immediate household or  traveling and adapting some traditions to increase safety.

For gatherings:

Remember that anytime you interact with people you do not live with, the risk of infection increases for everyone.
  • Hold celebrations to 10 people or fewer indoors, 25 outdoors.
  • Open presents, sing carols or just visit online. The whole family can participate, coast-to-coast and around the world.
  • Wear masks and stay 6 feet away from other guests, even outside
  • Open windows and doors to allow air to flow, weather permitting, if gathering indoors.
  • Encourage guests to bring their own food, drinks, and treats. Do not share utensils or drinking cups.
  • Keep a list of invited guests to help with contact tracing, if necessary.

For travelers:

Traveling increases the chance of getting and spreading COVID-19. Staying home is the best way to protect yourself and others. People planning to travel for Christmas should consider their transportation type (plane, car, bus, train, sleigh), the dates of their trip, and their risk to COVID-19 exposure while traveling.

For everyone-

  • Before departure, find out how widespread COVID-19 is at your destination.
  • Bring enough medications to last the entire trip.
  • Carry a travel hygiene kit—sanitizer, alcohol wipes, and extra masks. 

By car-

  • If you must travel, short trips by car with members of your household are best.
  • Minimize stops for gas, food, or bathroom breaks (if possible!)
  • Pack food, stop at drive-throughs, or use curbside pickup.
  • Designate one party member to handle transactions.
  • Wear masks when interacting with servers or cashiers.

By plane, train or bus-

  • Wear a mask while in your seat.
  • Avoid touching surfaces—turnstiles, handrails, restroom surfaces, elevator buttons, and benches—as much as possible.. Wipe down armrests and tray tables.
  • Stay at least 6 feet from people not from your household. Avoid crowded public spaces, especially at terminals, stations and stops. 
  • Wash your hands when you arrive. Sanitize when you leave.
  • Try to travel during non-peak hours, when there are likely to be fewer people.
  • Bring a reusable water bottle for every member of your group.

Additionally:

  • Avoid bars, house parties, and other crowded indoor places.
  • Don't drink and drive. Many cab and ride share companies offer free holiday rides to those who are unsafe to drive.
  • Get your flu shot.

Recommendations for Kwanzaa 2020

The PCHD encourages the focus on the home so central to the spirit of this holiday. Staying home is the best way to protect yourself and others. The PCHD highly recommends restricting celebrations to members of your immediate household or traveling and adapting some traditions to increase safety.

For gatherings:

Remember that anytime you interact with people you do not live with, the risk of infection increases for everyone.
  • Hold celebrations to 10 people or fewer indoors, 25 outdoors.
  • Choose one person to place items on the Mkeka or to light the Kinara.
  • Use the Kikombe cha Umoja to fill individual cups for each participant in the Tambiko.
  • Wear masks and stay 6 feet away from other guests, even outside
  • Open windows and doors to allow air to flow, weather permitting, if gathering indoors.
  • Encourage guests to bring their own food, drinks, and treats. Do not share utensils or drinking cups.
  • Keep a list of invited guests to help with contact tracing, if necessary.

For travelers:

Traveling increases the chance of getting and spreading COVID-19. Staying home is the best way to protect yourself and others. People planning to travel for Kwanzaa should consider their transportation type (plane, car, bus, train, sleigh), the dates of their trip, and their risk to COVID-19 exposure while traveling.

For everyone-

  • Before departure, find out how widespread COVID-19 is at your destination.
  • Bring enough medications to last the entire trip.
  • Carry a travel hygiene kit—sanitizer, alcohol wipes, and extra masks. 

By car-

  • If you must travel, short trips by car with members of your household are best.
  • Minimize stops for gas, food, or bathroom breaks (if possible!)
  • Pack food, stop at drive-throughs, or use curbside pickup.
  • Designate one party member to handle transactions.
  • Wear masks when interacting with servers or cashiers.

By plane, train or bus-

  • Wear a mask while in your seat.
  • Avoid touching surfaces—turnstiles, handrails, restroom surfaces, elevator buttons, and benches—as much as possible.. Wipe down armrests and tray tables.
  • Stay at least 6 feet from people not from your household. Avoid crowded public spaces, especially at terminals, stations and stops. 
  • Wash your hands when you arrive. Sanitize when you leave.
  • Try to travel during non-peak hours, when there are likely to be fewer people.
  • Bring a reusable water bottle for every member of your group.

Additionally:

  • Avoid bars, house parties, and other crowded indoor places.
  • Don't drink and drive. Many cab and ride share companies offer free holiday rides to those who are unsafe to drive.
  • Get your flu shot.

Recommendations for New Year's 2021

Ringing in the New Year usually means parties until midnight with friends and acquaintances old and new. But the change in the calendar doesn't mean we should change our approach to the pandemic. PCHD recommends celebrating with only the other people in your household as the safest option, but revelers can take steps to reduce their risk when out on the town or having guests over.

Going out?

  • Avoid multiple parties and bring your own beverages, snacks and noisemakers.
  • Prioritize attending outdoor activities over indoor activities.
  • Wear a mask. Reposition it after taking a drink.
  • Try to stay at least 6 feet from people not from your household in crowded public spaces such as nightclubs, restaurants or restrooms.
  • Wash or sanitize your hands after you arrive and immediately after touching common surfaces. such as doorknobs, counters, phones, toilets, faucets, or sinks.
  • Bring along extra sanitizer, alcohol wipes, and extra masks. 
  • Use cashless payment options, when possible. Or place your payment in a receipt tray, if available, or on the counter.

Playing host?

  • Stagger guests' arrivals and designate seating. 
  • Keep gatherings to 10 people inside, 25 outside. 
  • Make a guest list to help with contact tracing, if necessary. 
  • Provide hand sanitizer as a party favor.

For travelers:

Traveling increases the chance of getting and spreading COVID-19. Staying home is the best way to protect yourself and others. People planning to travel for Christmas should consider their transportation type (plane, car, bus, train, sleigh), the dates of their trip, and their risk to COVID-19 exposure while traveling.

For everyone-

  • Before departure, find out how widespread COVID-19 is at your destination.
  • Bring enough medications to last the entire trip.
  • Carry a travel hygiene kit—sanitizer, alcohol wipes, and extra masks. 

By car-

  • If you must travel, short trips by car with members of your household are best.
  • Minimize stops for gas, food, or bathroom breaks (if possible!)
  • Pack food, stop at drive-throughs, or use curbside pickup.
  • Designate one party member to handle transactions.
  • Wear masks when interacting with servers or cashiers.

By plane, train or bus-

  • Wear a mask while in your seat.
  • Avoid touching surfaces—turnstiles, handrails, restroom surfaces, elevator buttons, and benches—as much as possible.. Wipe down armrests and tray tables.
  • Stay at least 6 feet from people not from your household. Avoid crowded public spaces, especially at terminals, stations and stops. 
  • Wash your hands when you arrive. Sanitize when you leave.
  • Try to travel during non-peak hours, when there are likely to be fewer people.
  • Bring a reusable water bottle for every member of your group.

Additionally:

  • Reserve kissing at midnight for consenting members of your household.
  • Stay sober–substance use impairs judgement.
  • Don’t drink and drive. Many cab and ride sharing companies provide free or reduced-cost rides for those who overdo it.
  • Get your flu shot.

Recommendations for Halloween 2020

PCHD does not recommend trick-or-treating from door-to-door this year. However, if you decide to trick or treat or give out candy, please practice layered mitigation—use multiple protective measures—to make your experience as safe as possible:

If you hand out candy:

  • Wash hands before and after handing out (or eating) candy.
  • Hand out treats from a spot where you can avoid physical contact with trick-or-treaters—outdoors, if possible.
  • Mark one-way paths for visitors to come and go. 
  • Offer individually-bagged treats for kids to take.

If you go trick-or-treating:

  • Carry hand sanitizer, use it frequently, and take frequent breaks to help younger kids properly sanitize their hands.
  • Wear a cloth face mask, and don’t cover it with a costume mask—it can make it hard to breathe.
  • Wash hands with soap and water before eating candy.
  • Stay at least 6 feet from others who are not in your household.
  • Avoid other groups of trick-or-treaters.
  • Costumes should not be loose or long enough to pose a trip hazard, and should have a reflective elements for visibility.

Additionally:

  • Avoid parties, bars, and other crowded indoor spaces.
  • Gathering with people you don’t live with increases the risk for COVID-19 transmission, and should be avoided.
  • If you do gather with those who do not live your household, take it outdoors, wear masks, and physically distance from others. 
  • Stay home if you do not feel well, even if it feels mild. 
  • Don’t drink and drive. Many cab companies and ride sharing services provide free or reduced cost rides for those who overdo it.
  • Get your flu shot.

Recommendations for Día de los Muertos 2020

While celebrating Día de los Muertos at home with only the other people in your household is safest, there are ways to reduce risk if you're gathering with others. Please keep the following in mind:

  • Wear a cloth facemask when around others who do not live in your home. 
  • Wash your hands frequently, including every time you get home.
  • Get your flu shot as soon as possible. 
  • When out of your home, bring and use hand sanitizer.
  • Stay home if you don’t feel well.
  • Avoid sharing food. If you prepare family recipes, make separate portions of each dish.
  • Do not share serving utensils or common objects.
  • Go virtual: host an online get-together or celebration.
  • If you visit a cemetery, only travel with your own household.
  • Keep six feet away from other groups.
  • Hold any family or other gatherings outside, wearing masks, and keeping six feet away from others who do not live with you.

Additionally:

  • Avoid bars, house parties, and other crowded indoor places.
  • Don't drink and drive. Many cab and ride sharing companies offer free holiday lifts home to those who overdo it.
  • Get your flu shot.
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